Vienna, Austria

The most memorable experience in Austria was seeing and getting (slightly) involved in the immigrant journey, which I’ll write about in a separate post.

Other things I did while there included riding public transit, as I tend to do.

Pessimistic or prepared? The Viennese metro has electronic signs on all the doors that light up when they are broken.
Pessimistic or prepared? The Viennese metro has electronic signs on all the doors that light up when they are broken.
Not sure why the
Not sure why the “handicapped-priority seating” signs need to be so ominous.
Clever use of street signs for advancing personal beliefs.
Clever use of street signs for advancing personal beliefs.
Again a quick architecture shoutout to Hundertwasser.
A quick architecture shoutout to Hundertwasser.

You quickly realize how tourist attractions often aren’t unique to one city. The Badeschiff of Vienna literally has the same name as the one in Berlin; it’s a floating pool in a river you otherwise wouldn’t want to bathe in.

Not as appealing outside of the summer either.
Not as appealing outside of the summer either.

I was very impressed with the Viennese opera, not for any of their performances, but their accessibility. While the best tickets cost upwards of $200, they have day-of standing room tickets for $5, as well as an outdoor screen with loudspeakers so you can watch for free from just outside the venue. Economists might call this price discrimination, but I’d say it’s a great way to give everyone a chance to watch and listen.

Probably a better view than if you were to sit inside.
Probably a better view than if you were to sit inside.
Just watch out for hypothermia.
Just watch out for hypothermia.
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